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Tuesday, January 12, 2010

how to write a good resume

Writing a cover letter is an essential part of a job application. Employers seldom deliberately ask for a cover letter when advertising their position but do not take things too lightly here. After all, that piece of cover letter may be the deciding factor during the final short listing of candidates.

Here are some guides in writing a job winning cover letter:

1. Write a concise, straight to the point cover letter

Write a concise and compact cover letter that includes all the essential information in that piece of document. A cover letter is not an essay; it is a selling document that will trigger interest employer to go to the next step, which is reading your resume. Do not overdo when elaborating phrases and sentences and more importantly, do not just blindly copy the same old information you have put up in your resume. Do not go beyond a one-page cover letter.

2. Address the position correctly

Write your intention by addressing the exact position you’re applying for in your cover letter. “I’m writing to apply for the position of Marketing Manager as advertised recently” sounds a lot better than “I’m writing to apply for any job vacancy”. Its shows you did your homework and you are not just shooting blank. You’re aiming for the bull’s eye.

3. Make a good closure

Indicate your great interest with the position and that you look forward for a mutually beneficial discussion with the employer. You’re selling yourself here and it is particularly important for you to get the employer to conclude that you ‘may be just the right person for the job’. Finish off your cover letter with “yours sincerely” and do not forget the important part – enclose your resume together!

4. Proofread

Turn on the spelling and grammar tools and make sure every inch of the cover letter is covered to avoid any mistakes that would rank you among the silly bunch of people. Spelling tools may not be 100% accurate, get friends and colleagues to go through the cover letter and suggest any improvement. Let them fill the employer’s shoe and see if they get the ‘feel’ when skimming through your cover letter.

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How to Write a Good Resume

October 18th, 2009 — Resume

When searching for a new job, your resume is the most powerful tool you have to attract employer interest. Your resume is your introduction to your prospective employer and gives you an opportunity to either make a great first impression or fall flat on your face. Writing a perfectly good resume is therefore inevitable.

The importance of having a solid resume cannot be overstated. In most cases, this 1-2 page document is the first and only look your employer will get of you before he or she picks who is going to be interviewed, so it is extremely important to make the sale with your resume.

The first step in writing an effective resume is writing your cover letter. Your cover letter is basically your way of introducing yourself to your prospective employer and explaining what you have to offer to the organization. Your cover letter should be tailored specifically to each employer you’re applying to and mention exactly how your skills and experience can meet their needs.

When writing your resume, you should be as complete and concise as possible. Your resume should be no longer than two pages, but should contain as much relevant information as possible about your skills and experience.

Your resume should include your name, address, contact information, education, work experience and references. Presentation of this information is important and there are a variety of Web sites with good models to pattern the design of your resume after. Check out Monster.com for some excellent examples of good resumes.

When listing your work experience on your resume, you’ll probably have to list why you left some jobs. Avoid griping about work conditions or money when talking about your reasons for leaving, as it may give your prospective employer the impression that you have a bad attitude or poor work ethic. Instead say that you decided to pursue growth opportunities or wanted a new challenge.

Also remember to contact the folks you list as references on your resume. It’s common courtesy, and it ensures that the references you’re listing actually will put in a good word for you.

When writing and completing your resume, be sure to run it through a spelling and grammar checking program. Also have a friend read it to make sure that the program didn’t miss or misinterpret anything. Having spelling and grammar errors on your resume basically equates to walking into your job interview with your pants down, so please take the time to proofread. You know you have done a pretty good job in writing a resume when interviews come knocking after sending a few resumes out.

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Tuesday, January 12, 2010

how to write a good resume

Posted by ~cNastygurlz~ at 9:54 PM
Writing a cover letter is an essential part of a job application. Employers seldom deliberately ask for a cover letter when advertising their position but do not take things too lightly here. After all, that piece of cover letter may be the deciding factor during the final short listing of candidates.

Here are some guides in writing a job winning cover letter:

1. Write a concise, straight to the point cover letter

Write a concise and compact cover letter that includes all the essential information in that piece of document. A cover letter is not an essay; it is a selling document that will trigger interest employer to go to the next step, which is reading your resume. Do not overdo when elaborating phrases and sentences and more importantly, do not just blindly copy the same old information you have put up in your resume. Do not go beyond a one-page cover letter.

2. Address the position correctly

Write your intention by addressing the exact position you’re applying for in your cover letter. “I’m writing to apply for the position of Marketing Manager as advertised recently” sounds a lot better than “I’m writing to apply for any job vacancy”. Its shows you did your homework and you are not just shooting blank. You’re aiming for the bull’s eye.

3. Make a good closure

Indicate your great interest with the position and that you look forward for a mutually beneficial discussion with the employer. You’re selling yourself here and it is particularly important for you to get the employer to conclude that you ‘may be just the right person for the job’. Finish off your cover letter with “yours sincerely” and do not forget the important part – enclose your resume together!

4. Proofread

Turn on the spelling and grammar tools and make sure every inch of the cover letter is covered to avoid any mistakes that would rank you among the silly bunch of people. Spelling tools may not be 100% accurate, get friends and colleagues to go through the cover letter and suggest any improvement. Let them fill the employer’s shoe and see if they get the ‘feel’ when skimming through your cover letter.

1 Comment
How to Write a Good Resume

October 18th, 2009 — Resume

When searching for a new job, your resume is the most powerful tool you have to attract employer interest. Your resume is your introduction to your prospective employer and gives you an opportunity to either make a great first impression or fall flat on your face. Writing a perfectly good resume is therefore inevitable.

The importance of having a solid resume cannot be overstated. In most cases, this 1-2 page document is the first and only look your employer will get of you before he or she picks who is going to be interviewed, so it is extremely important to make the sale with your resume.

The first step in writing an effective resume is writing your cover letter. Your cover letter is basically your way of introducing yourself to your prospective employer and explaining what you have to offer to the organization. Your cover letter should be tailored specifically to each employer you’re applying to and mention exactly how your skills and experience can meet their needs.

When writing your resume, you should be as complete and concise as possible. Your resume should be no longer than two pages, but should contain as much relevant information as possible about your skills and experience.

Your resume should include your name, address, contact information, education, work experience and references. Presentation of this information is important and there are a variety of Web sites with good models to pattern the design of your resume after. Check out Monster.com for some excellent examples of good resumes.

When listing your work experience on your resume, you’ll probably have to list why you left some jobs. Avoid griping about work conditions or money when talking about your reasons for leaving, as it may give your prospective employer the impression that you have a bad attitude or poor work ethic. Instead say that you decided to pursue growth opportunities or wanted a new challenge.

Also remember to contact the folks you list as references on your resume. It’s common courtesy, and it ensures that the references you’re listing actually will put in a good word for you.

When writing and completing your resume, be sure to run it through a spelling and grammar checking program. Also have a friend read it to make sure that the program didn’t miss or misinterpret anything. Having spelling and grammar errors on your resume basically equates to walking into your job interview with your pants down, so please take the time to proofread. You know you have done a pretty good job in writing a resume when interviews come knocking after sending a few resumes out.

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